Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Is your baby safe in his/her crib?

Crib Convertible Elite
We are talking about security, not your security, we discuss the security of what you love most; your baby.
In furniture Ros, we take this issue very seriously, we can talk about design, functionality or other features that highlight our product, but first we have to ensure the safety.
Be advised by the experts, even ask friends who have already had children. But there are things that depend on you; of what you choose or what you buy.
Have you ever wondered when you go to choose your baby's bedroom, if all the furniture on the market meet all the safety certificates and approvals..
This is an essential starting point and can avoid trouble in the future. Not all furniture we find in the market meet these requirements, and we are not talking about cheap brands.
They still exist in our country domestic manufacturers that do not meet several of these safety standards generally, and they copied designs from other manufacturers, and perhaps therefore they save costs and offer a cheaper product than the rest, by minimizing the hardware, thicknesses or the required minimum distances for safety.
The result is a crib, apparently similar to the one they copied, but which does not meet safety approvals and the safety certificates required, and it can have consequences that we may regret in the future.
Our advice is to ask at the store, before making any purchases, which products meet basic safety standards.
If you have doubts ask about manufacturer.

Monday, February 9, 2015

Children, Electronics and Sleep



The increasing prevalence of electronics in children’s bedrooms creates a culture of evening engagement and light exposure that negatively impacts sleep time, sleep quality and daytime alertness.   

Children using electronic media as a sleep aid to relax at night have been shown to have later weekday bedtimes, experience fewer hours of sleep per week and report more daytime sleepiness. 
Adolescents with a bedroom television have later bedtimes, more difficulty initiating sleep and shorter total sleep times. 
Texting and emailing after lights outs, even once per week, dramatically increases self-reported daytime sleepiness among teens. 
Not all electronic usage is recreational as the burden of homework is great for many of our children and their work is often completed on the computer, a significant light source late in the evening. 
Increased academic demands, busy social and extracurricular schedules and the lure of entertainment conspire to keep our children electronically engaged at night. 
Many children are not fulfilling basic sleep requirements and adequate sleep is essential for growth, learning, mood, creativity and weight control.  Understanding the influence of light and evening engagement on sleep is the first step in helping parents address the dilemma of electronics in the bedroom. 

Source: http://sleepfoundation.org/